Monument Valley - Mexican Hat - Gooseneck

 

After leaving Page in the morning a long way was ahead of us for reaching Monument Valley. 

Monument Valley itself is very large and a lot to see there (or not) ... depends on how you look at it. 

After leaving Monument Valley in the evening we went for Mexican Hat and also Goosenecks. 

Road to Monument Valley
Road to Monument Valley

Monument Valley

 

Monument Valley (Navajo: Tsé Biiʼ Ndzisgaii, meaning valley of the rocks) is a region of the Colorado Plateau characterized by a cluster of vast sandstone buttes, the largest reaching 1,000 ft (300 m) above the valley floor. It is located on the Arizona-Utah state line, near the Four Corners area.

The valley lies within the range of the Navajo Nation Reservation and is accessible from U.S. Highway 163.

 

Source: {wikipedia}

Mexican Hat
Mexican Hat

Mexican Hat

 

Mexican Hat is a census-designated place (CDP) on the San Juan River in south-central San Juan County, Utah, United States. The population was 31 at the 2010 census, a sharp decline from the previous two censuses.

The name "Mexican Hat" comes from a curiously sombrero-shaped, 60-foot (18 m) wide by 12-foot (3.7 m) thick, rock outcropping on the northeast edge of town. The "Hat"' has two rock climbing routes ascending it. It has frequently been noted on lists of unusual place names.

 

Source: {wikipedia}

Goosenecks

 

Goosenecks State Park is a state park in the U.S. state of Utah, overlooking a deep meander of the San Juan River. The park is located near the southern border of the state a short distance from Mexican Hat, Utah.

 

Millions of years ago, the Monument Upwarp forced the river to carve incised meanders over 1,000 feet (300 m) deep as the surrounding landscape slowly rose in elevation. Eroded by water, wind, frost, and gravity, this is a classic location for observing incised meanders.

 

Source: {wikipedia}

 

For more see the following Album.